Death Song No. 26: “Beyond paradise and hell, there is no cloud hanging over my heart.” (Kenshin Uesugi)

There is probably no military commander more mysterious than Uesugi Kenshin. Kenshin was born as the youngest son of his father, Tamekage Nagao, who was the governor of Echigo, and passed on the headship of the family to his older brother who was in poor health. Kenshin, who was known as the ``Echigo Tiger,'' lived a life of war. Novel with Takeda Shingen...

Death Song No. 25 “It’s only when the wind blows and grudges that spring blooms and autumn leaves the lingering leaves” (Ujimasa Hojo)

Hojo Ujimasa, the fourth generation of the Hojo clan in Odawara, formed an alliance with Takeda Shingen and Uesugi Kenshin and expanded his power to the northern Kanto region, but when Odawara Castle was besieged by Toyotomi Hideyoshi, he surrendered and committed suicide along with his younger brother Ujiteru. As a result, the Hojo clan was destroyed, and all of its territory was annexed...

Death Song No. 24 ``Let's give the name of the ephemeral ruins of a summer night's dream road to Kumoi, Yamahototogisu'' (Katsuie Shibata), ``Wouldn't it be better to say goodbye to a summer night than to sleep at Saranuda?'' (Oichi)

Katsuie Shibata was a military commander during the Azuchi-Momoyama period. He first served Oda Nobunaga's younger brother Nobuyuki, and later became one of Nobunaga's vassals. He was highly praised as a fierce general, and when Omi Chokoji Castle was attacked by water by Rokkaku Shotei, he broke a water bottle and went out with a desperate determination to defeat the enemy...

Death Poem Part 23: “If you want to cross this floating world, now is the time to leave your name on the moss of Takamatsu” (Muneharu Shimizu)

Muneharu Shimizu was a military commander during the late Sengoku period and the lord of Takamatsu Castle in Bitchu. They fought against Toyotomi Hideyoshi's conquest of China and suffered from water attacks. Eventually, the Honnoji Incident occurred, and Hideyoshi, wanting to quickly bring the situation under control, made peace on the condition that Muneharu commit suicide, and Muneharu accepted this and committed suicide.

Death Song No. 22: “Even though I thought it would have taken a long time, I still regret the loss of my life.” (Yoshikage Asakura)

Yoshikage Asakura was a Sengoku daimyo of Echizen. Yoshikage's name was derived from the last name of Shogun Yoshiteru Ashikaga, which shows the extent of his loyalty to the Shogun family. He teamed up with Azai Nagamasa to fight against Oda Nobunaga, but was defeated in the Battle of Anegawa, and was captured by Ichijodani, where he committed suicide. By the way, Echizen...

Death Song No. 21: “I will leave behind this world and make it into my final home” (Dosan Saito)

``I will give up and live in this world, or I will become my final home.'' (Dosan Saito) Dosan Saito was a military commander in the middle of the Sengoku period.His common name was Toshimasa, but he entered Buddhism and took the name Dosan. Ta. It is said that he started his life as an oil seller and became the lord of Mino in one generation. Yoshi, the legitimate child...

Death Song Part 20 “My personal appearance disappears along with the bonfires lit in Chikumae and Ashima” (Mitsunari Ishida)

Mitsunari Ishida served Toyotomi Hideyoshi, a military commander at the end of the Sengoku period, and served as one of the five magistrates.He served in the Kyushu conquest, Bunroku and Keicho campaigns, and achieved great administrative results, including Taiko kenchi. After Hideyoshi's death, he fought with Tokugawa Ieyasu, was defeated at the Battle of Sekigahara, and was finally beheaded at Rokujo Kawahara in Kyoto.

Death Song No. 19 ``Whatever you hit and what you hit, the pottery shatters, and what's left is the original clay.'' (Yoshitoshi Miura)

Aspects of impermanence Part 1: ``Accept'' ``Whatever you hit and what you hit will shatter like pottery, and what's left is the original clay.'' (Yoshido Miura) Yoshitoshi Miura (Dosun) was a military commander at the beginning of the Sengoku period. He was the head of the Miura clan that ruled the eastern part of Sagami Province. However, after being invaded by Hojo Soun and others,...

Death Songs since the Middle Ages (Introduction) ~ Thoughts on the End of the Law and a Sense of Impermanence ~

From the Kamakura period onward, death poems began to feature a strong theme: the sense of impermanence. This term ``impermanence'' originally comes from ``impermanence of all actions'', one of the three Dharma seals of Buddhism, and its meaning is simply ``occurrence due to cause and effect'', and it is understood by anyone other than Shakyamuni...

Death Song No. 18 "Don't let your guard down in each day, even if you think it will happen today. It's a life of dew that you don't know about tomorrow" (Jien)

I'm afraid to comment on the exhibit because it's not clear exactly what it will be on display, but this time I would like to introduce a unique death poem. This is the death poem of former Grand Priest Shojien. ``Don't let your guard down day by day, thinking it will happen today, it's a life of dew that you don't know about tomorrow'' (Jien) What do you think after reading this at a glance?

Death Song No. 17 ``If you leave and leave, you will become a hostless hostel, but don't forget spring, plum blossoms at the edge of the eaves'' (Minamoto no Sanetomo)

Minamoto no Sanetomo was the third shogun of the Kamakura shogunate. His father was Minamoto no Yoritomo, and he became the third shogun after his older brother Yoriie, the second shogun, was imprisoned. Although he was unable to hold real political power due to being blocked by the Hojo clan, he became interested in Kyoto's culture, especially waka, and even compiled a collection of his family's poems, ``Kanegoi Wakashu.'' Passed away...

Death Song No. 16 ``If you live in the shade under a tree, you'll be better off with flowers and tonight'' (Taira Taira)

Last time, I introduced Minamoto no Yorimasa's death poem, and there was also a warrior from the Heike clan who was good at singing, Taira Taira. Tadanori was Taira no Kiyomori's half-brother, and it is said that he studied under the great poet of the time, Fujiwara Toshinari, so we can see how passionate he was about singing. But...

Death Song No. 15 “The flowers of the buried tree will never bloom, and the end of my life will be pitiful” (Minamoto no Yorimasa)

If you are a fan of waka poetry, there are probably few people who don't know his name: Minamoto no Yorimasa. He was a famous poet whose 59 poems were included in the imperial collection, and he was an attractive man with great literary and military skills who would have been extremely popular if his poems had been included in the Hyakunin Isshu. Yorimasa as Yasumoto...

Death Song No. 14 “Is it the spring sky that is known to the light snow that disappears after passing into the world?” (Ippen Shonin)

Ippen Shonin was a monk from the early Kamakura period, but he may be less well known than the founders of the six sects of so-called "Kamakura New Buddhism" such as Nichiren and Shinran. This is because Ippen burned all of his last works before his death, and the Tokimune, which was the founder of the sect, was relatively small...

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