The healing auspicious event of the snow falling today in early spring at the beginning of a new year (Otomo Ieyamochi)

New Year's Day is often referred to as ``new year,'' ``beginning of the year,'' and ``early spring,'' but it is said that since ancient times, snow falling on New Year's Day was a good omen for a bountiful harvest. This is a four-phrase preface, and concludes with, ``May good things come to you,'' making it a truly auspicious song...

The moon, the spring of darkness, and the springs of the past.Restore your body to its original body (Narihira Ariwara)

The flowers have bloomed. The plum blossoms on the edge of the eaves are waving with scent, and unknown flowers are smiling along the roadside. If you wander around, leaving it to your happy heart, you will eventually come to a halt at the sight of a rising hazy moon. I don't know what happened, but everything I see in the flowers, birds, wind, and moon looks different. ``The moon is and spring is a long time ago...''

A person who naturally admires the unspoken and a person who is so calm that the end of the year (Saigyo)

The spring I once longed for. However, I have been able to appreciate several Heian poets' emotional fluctuations toward the year-end gift, which makes me daunt when I see them in front of me. Although there are differences on the surface, the underlying theme is a sense of awe, and the scars of resignation and resistance to the seemingly endless flow of time. Heian period, especially in its final period...

As I grieve, I remember that even this year, the dew's life is still alive (Toshie)

Toshie's year-end gift is more decadent than anything I've seen so far. It is a common phrase in waka poetry that can be compared to the morning dew that disappears from the side where you left your life, but today's poem has the feeling that the metaphor is not a metaphor at all. This is because we have reached the impermanent essence that life is nothing but a series of moments. ...

I wonder if the water flowing through the Yasoji River in Mononofu is early at the end of the year (Minamoto no Sanetomo)

Year-end wish by Minamoto Sanetomo. ``Time has flown by like water flowing through the Uji River, and the end of the year has already arrived,'' is a very simple comment. By the way, ``Mononofu'' (Mononobe) means ``a literary and military official who serves the imperial court,'' so ``Mononofu no Yasoji''...

The year is coming to an end for the bare branches without leaves, and spring is approaching when they should sprout again (Tamekane Kyogoku)

``All the leaves on the trees have fallen. But don't worry, the year is coming to an end and new budding spring is just around the corner.'' Although we are saddened by the passing of another year, the anticipation for spring is finally building, and everyone can't help but feel excited. However, this January (Mutsuki)...

The grass on the hedge turns green and spring approaches even under the frost (Fushimi-in Temple)

Even the masters of the Kyogoku school, who were thorough in their realism, finally couldn't bear it anymore and spoke out loud. ``Before I knew it, the grass on the hedge had turned blue, and even under this frost, spring was approaching.'' ``Spring is coming!'' Such honest feelings can be found in the Sandaishu, which are many times old.

The shadow of the arrival is the Ariake moon that will soon fade into haze and turn into spring (Prince Sotaka)

Yesterday, Tameie's house was ``Tama Mizu at the eaves'', so what makes you feel spring? I want you to think about it for a while. The bushes of butterflies peeking through the snow, the melting snow reflecting the light... there should be a feeling of spring coming in all sorts of colors. An uncouth person who talks about warmth will never become a poet...

As the falling snow fades into rain, the sound of water on the eaves is heard (Tameie Fujiwara)

In a complete turn of events, today's song is a wonderful one, written by Tamie, the eldest son of Fujiwara Teika. ``The falling snow turns into rain. The snow on the roof was starting to melt from below, and the sound of raindrops on the eaves became fainter.'' The snow was gradually disappearing, and the rain was beginning to fall from the roof. Of course spring...

The snow that falls on the branches of a plum tree is like a flower blooming again (Fujiwara Kinto)

His name stirs up expectations, but today, too, I'm disappointed that he has sunk into a mediocre work... Fujiwara Kinto. It's not a bad idea to refer to ``snow'' as ``flower,'' no, it's certainly the height of banality, but you already know that this routine is a waka poem. One of the problems is the ``tone'' of the song...

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